Middle School Activities

GirlReadingOnLawn

The collection of grade-appropriate activities below may be used to enhance the summer reading experience for students. The activities are reflective of different learning styles and several of them focus on high-order tasks as required by Language Arts Florida Standards. Schools may use the following activities as listed or may modify them to meet specific student learning styles. The length of the assignment and the amount of time that will be required to complete it should be considered when making summer reading assignments..

  • Keep a reading log or journal on the books you have read and make a list of words you have learned. Write the new word, copy the sentence in which it is used, write a definition using your own words, and draw a picture or a symbol which reminds you what the word means.
  • Create and record a rap or song about one of the books you have read.
  • Write a paragraph telling about the title. Is it appropriate? Why not? If you feel it is not appropriate provide an alternate title and explain why this title is better.
  • Look through magazines for words and pictures that describe your book. Use these to create a collage or a bookmark.
  • Create a Meme for each book that you have read or one Meme that combines all of the books that you have read.
  • Write a summary of your book in the most compelling way you can on paper the size of a business card.
  • Using email or other means of corresponding, write to another person (friend or parent) about the book as you read it, having a written conversation about the book.
  • Write a poem about the idea, character, concept or information presented in your book.
  • Some characters are interesting and you can relate to, while others possess a specific personality that is intriguing. Select one of those characters that possess a specific personality that is intriguing, explain how and why it is intriguing. Use evidence from the text to support your answer.
  • Instead of traveling into the book, write a scene or story including pictures in which the character(s) travel out of the book into today.
  • Tape an interview with one of the characters in a book you have read. Pretend that this character is being interviewed by a magazine or newspaper reporter. Write a script before taping in case you might want to ask the assistance of a partner.
  • Design a T-shirt that promotes your book and write a jingle to sell it.
  • Search the Internet for virtual tours based on the book you are reading. Log your findings in your reading log/journal. Visit the author's official website to conduct research and write your findings.
  • Design a poster with words and pictures to advertise your book. Be creative…use details…elaborate…use color! Try to make it 3-D or movable.
  • Draw/Paint a multi-colored cover for your book. It must be different from any other cover for that book. Write important "book jacket" information.
  • Plan a party for the characters in the book you read. In order to do this, complete each of the following tasks:
    • (a) Design an invitation to the party which would appeal to all of the characters.
    • (b) Imagine that you are the characters in the book and tell what each would wear at the party.
    • (c) Tell what food you would serve and why.
    • (d) Tell what games or entertainment you will provide and why your choices are appropriate.
    • (e) Tell how the characters act at the party.
    • (f) What kind of a party is this? (birthday, housewarming, anniversary, etc.)
  • Write a character diary, writing at least six journal entries as if you are the main character in the story. Write down events that happen during the story and reflect on how they affected the character and why.
  • Write a one page "pitch" to a producer explaining why the story would or would not make a great movie.
  • Identify the problem or information presented in your book. Write to explain how you would have responded if you were in the same situation and why.
  • Write an advice column (Dear Abby) giving the author of the book advice on how they should handle the problems/dilemmas in the text.
  • Write an editorial column stating your position regarding the reasons and evidence the author has provided on the idea(s), concept(s) or event(s) presented.
  • As a literary agent, write a letter to the publishing company designed to persuade them to publish this book.
  • Create a Top Ten List in which you write and illustrate events or ideas you have learned from the book.
  • After reading the book(s) write your own test. The test may be a combination of matching, multiple choice, multiselect items, drag and drop, short answer, and essay questions.
  • Use the internet to locate a postal, or email address of your favorite author. Write an opinion letter referencing one of their books. Use evidence from the text to state your opinion.