Senior Activities

TeenReadingOnBench

The collection of grade-appropriate activities below may be used to enhance the summer reading experience for students. The activities are reflective of different learning styles and several of them focus on high-order tasks as required by Language Arts Florida Standards. Schools may use the following activities as listed or may modify them to meet specific student learning styles. The length of the assignment and the amount of time that will be required to complete it should be considered when making summer reading assignments.

  • Keep a reading log or journal on the books you have read and make a list of words you have learned. Write the new word, copy the sentence in which it is used, write a definition using your own words, and draw a picture or a symbol which reminds you what the word means.
  • Create a Meme for each book that you have read, or one Meme combining all the books that you have read.
  • Imagine that you have been given the task of conducting a tour of the town in which the book you read is set. Write a video script or create a PowerPoint describing the homes of your characters and the places where important events in the book took place. Be creative!
  • Design an advertising campaign to promote the sale of the book you read. Include each of the following: a poster, a radio or TV commercial, a magazine or newspaper ad, a bumper sticker, and a button.
  • Make a timeline of the major events in the book you read. Be sure the divisions on the timeline reflect the time period in the plot. Use drawings, words or magazine cutouts to illustrate events along the timeline.
  • Create a mandala with many levels to connect different aspects of the book, its historical time, and culture. Write an explanation of your mandala.
  • Make a "wanted" poster for one of the characters or objects in your book. Include the following:
    • (a) a drawing or cut out picture of the character or object,
    • (b) a physical description of the character or object,
    • (c) the character's or object's misdeeds (or deeds?),
    • (d) other information about the character or object which is important,
    • (e) the reward offered for the capture of the character or object.
  • Imagine that the book you are reading has been challenged by a special interest group. Write a letter defending the book, using specific evidence from the book to support your ideas.
  • Draw an empty head and inside of it draw any symbols, words, or images that are bouncing around in the mind of the character of a story.
  • Write a biographical sketch of one character. Fill in what you don't find in the text using your own imagination.
  • Using the Internet, research what information is contained in a passport. Create a passport which belongs to one of the characters of your book. Be sure that the passport contains all of the information found on an authentic passport.
  • Create a sculpture of a character. Use any combination of soap, wood, clay, sticks, wire, stone, old toy pieces, or any other object to create your sculpture. Then write an explanation of how this character fits into the book.
  • Take a 3x5 card and write a summary of the events of the story on one side. On the other, analyze the importance of what happened and the reasons they happened.
  • Find five websites a character in your book would most frequently visit. Include the websites and an explanation of why your character would choose these sites.
  • Imagine that you are the author of the book you just read. Suddenly the book becomes a best seller. Write a letter to a movie producer to convince that person to make your book into a movie. Explain why the story, characters, conflicts, etc.., would make a good film. Suggest a filming location and the actors to play the various roles. You may only use books which have not already been made into movies.
  • Construct a diorama (three-dimensional scene which includes models of people, building, plants, and animals) of one of the main events of the book. Include a written explanation how this information contributes to an understanding of the book.
  • Write a character diary, writing at least eight journal entries as if you are the main character in the story. Write down events that happened during the story and reflect on how they affected the character and why.
  • Write another beginning and ending for the story. Include drawing/sketches to illustrate the changes.
  • Write a one page "pitch" to a producer explaining why the story would or would not make a great movie.
  • Identify the character's main problem in the story. Write to explain how you would have responded if you were in the same situation.
  • Write an advice column (Dear Abby) giving the author of the book advice on how they should handle the problems/dilemmas in the text.
  • As a literary agent, write a letter to the publishing company designed to persuade them to publish this book.
  • Create a Top Ten List in which you write and illustrate events and ideas you have learned from the book.
  • You are the reporter. Write a front page news story or a report live from the scene.
  • Some characters are interesting and you can relate to, while others possess a specific personality that is intriguing. Select one of those characters that possess a specific personality that is intriguing, and explain how and why it is intriguing. Use evidence from the text to support your answer.
  • There are scenes and lines that are unforgettable. Select a scene(s) and a line(s) from one of the books you have read, and explain how and why you feel they are unforgettable. Use evidence from the text to support your answer.